Infragram Project: How to make a DIY Infrared Camera for only $10

6/24/2013 ISO 1200 Magazine 0 Comments


This Kickstarter project is simple, to get a cheap infrared camera which can measure plant health -- for geek gardeners, farmers, and open source DIY scientists.

We've been modifying cheap cameras to take near-infrared (IR) photos. Though we cannot perceive it with our eyes the plants and other materials around us reflect wavelengths of light in infrared. Interestingly the sensors in digital camera can react to wavelengths of light in the near infrared. Presently IR light is filtered out from our cameras so that digital images look normal to us. Removing that filter allows us to pick up information in IR.-explain publiclab.org )

How could be this project only for geek gardeners? From ISO1200 think there are a lot of geek photographers out there waiting an opportunity to shoot Infrared photography.

Infragram Camera
For months I have been researching different possibilities for initiating me into infrared photography. The best option was to modify one of my old cameras removing the infrared filter.

A good example of the excellent results that can be obtained with infrared photography is the documentary:


The Enclave': Discontinued military 16mm infrared film to show the calamities of a war zone by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten ( CLICK TO WATCH IT)
( CLICK TO WATCH IT)

Yesterday I threw myself into modify an old Canon IXUS i, a really small camera  with an excellent quality for its time.

WATCH OUT: BE CAREFUL!

You do this at your own risk!
 This was the result:
 
My old camara without autofocus

It took some time but we got to remove the infrared filter. The problem, sometimes happens that the autofocus stops working properly like happened to us because the missing glass changes the optical properties of the whole assembly ( explains from hars.de )

What solutions do we have?


1. DIY INFRARED

If you have an old camera you no longer use is the time to buy a DIY filter for 10 dollars and change it. Or you can buy for $ 80 a Canon PowerShot A810 on Amazon  that allows you to install CHDK and shoot RAW. I will do this.



What is DIY "superblue" Filter Pack?


(via publiclab.org)
This is just a piece of "infrablue" filter which you can use to turn your webcam or cheap point-and-shoot into an infrared camera. The filter allows you to take an infrared photo in the "red" channel of your camera, and a visible image in the "blue" channel. You'll also receive a white balance card and instructions on how install your filter -- it's pretty easy!

You can buy it: HERE


2. SEND YOUR CAMERA TO A PROFESSIONAL

If you want to modify a DSLR camera the best is to leave it to a professional to replace the filter internally. Possibly the best known are www.lifepixel.com 



3. BUY A MODIFIED CAMERA

I only have founded a web www.shade-infrared.com in Jakarta which sells modified compact cameras with filters. I can not tell you more, but the photos look nice. You can buy under your our risk.
4. LOMOCHROME PURPLE



 A Color Negative Film That Yields Infrared Results , it is not infrared but...it is easy. More information here


DIY DIGITAL INFRARED CAMERA MODIFICATIONS TUTORIALS

1. Life Pixel  have a lot of "Do It Yourself " Digital Infrared Camera Modification Tutorials: here

2. Conversion of an old PowerShotA460 to an infrared camera

3. Canon A2200 conversion 

4. A list of Infragram convertible cameras

EXPLORING INFRARED CINEMATOGRAPHY:

Do you remember "MōVI RED Epic IR Test" by

Maybe you have not money to buy a modified Red Camera for infrared, but they have a cool 101 tutorial about  infrared Cinematograpy  (visit red.com ). Ok, no problem, the perfect tool for infrared cinematography  is an old Canon 50D with Magic Lantern Firmware that can shoot RAW video.


Canon 50D Infrared  with Magic Lantern
Here the tutorial to remove the filter: lifepixel.com/tutorials/infrared-diy-tutorials/canon-50d-ir


You are welcome to infrared photography. This is just the beginning, edit the infrared images are another world!!!

Video via Infragram: the Infrared Photography Project

And remember: You do this at your own risk!

ISO1200 has no business relationship with the companies profiled .

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